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Recipes with Rosie: Breakfast

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​Our new video series, Recipes with Rosie, helps teach you how to cook Kid friendly meals developed by Springfree Ambassador, World Champion and Olympic Gold Medalist in Trampoline, Rosie MacLennan. In this episode, Rosie and her kid helpers are making two healthy breakfast ideas.

Healthy Pancakes

Ingredients:

  • 1 banana
  • ½ cup blueberries
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup rolled oats
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch of salt

 

Directions:

  1. In a blender combine all ingredients
  2. Blend until the mixture is smooth
  3. Grease pan and heat it up pan pour batter onto a greased hot pan, when the pancakes bubble flip them.
  4. Serve with nut butters, honey, maple syrup or fresh fruit

 

Eggs & Advocato Toast

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 avocado
  • 1 tomato
  • ¼ lemon
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 slices of bread

 

Directions:

  1. Cook eggs in any style to your liking- my fav is either poached (in a poacher) or over easy
  2. Toast break- multigrain fresh is the best- can also use English muffins or whatever you may like
  3. Mash up an avocado adding a bit of lemon and salt (and hot sauce if you like)
  4. Slice tomatoes thinly
  5. Once bread is toasted, spread mashed avocado on toast, put sliced tomatoes on top and then cooked eggs on top of that 

 

 

There's a storm coming.... follow these tips to keep your Springfree Trampoline safe!

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February is bringing some interesting weather around Australia.

 

we've put toether some tips for ensuring your trampoline stays safe and intact.

  • Drop the net to the mat level. Watch t video below for more instructions.Click here to see the disassemblel process
  • A tarp covering strapped down can help. 
  • If possible, move your Springfree Trampoline to an undercover/secure area.
  • If you have anchors/sandbags, place in position to hold down the frame. 

Call us on 1800 586 772 for more assistance. 

 

Amanda Parker: Fun Activities for Kids, Part 4

It is important that children lead healthier lifestyles and incorporate physical activity into their daily schedules. Recent research has shown that there has been an increase in childhood obesity amongst children. It is therefore paramount, that with the right help, children are encouraged to take part in physical activity through fun games that stimulate both body and mind. Fun games can be accessed easily and can help keep children healthy and active now, in addition to contributing to a more positive attitude towards being physically active later in life. Children also have the opportunity to develop social and motor skills through sport and physical education. This can help to increase levels of self-confidence and self-esteem, which are associated with improving in sport. Below are a range of games that children can take part in with minimal equipment that are easy to set up. 

 

Balloon Relay

Time: 5 min

Recommended age: all ages

Size of group: it doesn’t matter

Equipment: balloons

 

How to play balloon relay

  • Set up teams
  • This is a simple relay race where the players must have a balloon clenched between their legs.
  • The balloon is not allowed to touch the ground during the race. If this happens the player must return to their starting position and continue the race.
  • Fastest team wins

 

Option

  • Two players from one team join up to perform a relay race through an obstacle course.
  • They must hold a balloon between their stomachs or heads whilst doing this. Anyone who holds the balloon with their hands or lets it fall must start again.

 

 

Hand Towel Balloon Relay

 

Time: 8 min

Recommended age: 5 and above

Size of group: it doesn’t matter

Equipment: balloons / hand towels or small blanket

 

How to play hand towel balloon relay

  • Set up two or more teams
  • Two players in one team must pair up and each hold the two ends of a hand towel with a balloon placed in the middle.
  • The teams must relay race with their balloons staying against their hand towels.
  • If the balloon falls off then they must return to the beginning and start again.

 

Towel and Ball Throw Relay

 

Time: 8 min

Recommended age: 7 and above

Size of group: it doesn’t matter

Equipment: soft ball (i.e. tennis, sponge ball) / hand towels or small blanket

 

How to play towel and ball throw relay

  • Set up two or more teams
  • Two players in one team must pair up and hold the two ends of a hand towel with a ball placed on top.
  • The teams must relay race whilst throwing the ball up and catching back on the towel.
  • If the pair drop the ball then they must pick up from where they left off and continue.

 

Meet Amanda Parker 

Amanda Parker started competing in trampoline at the age of 6 and was representing Great Britain by the time she was 16. By 17 she had competed in her first major international event and finished 2nd in the World Age Group Games in 2003. From there, Amanda made vast improvements and became a member of the senior British team representing Great Britain in numerous World Cups and World Championships in individual and synchronized trampoline. Her biggest achievements to date are being the 2013 World Games Champion and World Champion in synchronised Trampoline with her partner Kat Driscoll. She was the reserve for the London 2012 Games and holds the record for the highest scoring British female internationally. Amanda was ranked 4th individually in Europe in 2012. Amanda is thankful for all the support she has received to help her to become a World Class trampolinist. Her parents help and support of her dreams continues as they follow her around the world to see her compete. She has a fantastic coaching team at Edgbarrow Trampoline Club and within the Great Britain National Programme to help her reach her full potential. Additionally Amanda is grateful to her sponsor Springfree Trampoline and the funding received through UK Sport that supports her journey on reaching her dream to be an Olympic athlete.

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Choosing A Trampoline For Australian Conditions

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As with most outdoor products, many trampolines will spend all year outside experiencing the full force of our harsh climate. This blog will highlight some of the key aspects to be aware of when choosing the right trampoline for your local conditions.

Rust

Whether it’s your shiny new car or children’s bicycle, rust spares nothing. It is a slow killer and will quietly eat away at most metals until there is literally nothing left. Clearly with a trampoline that remains outside 365 days a year it is critical you take into account the rust proofing of the unit before you make a purchase.

Most trampolines will come standard with some claim of being “rustproof”. However, unless they can outline exactly what they do and how, there is no industry standard that something will hold up to the salty-killer. The Springfree trampoline frame is constructed using heavy-duty, triple-coated galvanised steel. This keeps a multi-layer barrier between the salt and any raw metal that may be at risk.  The metal springs used in traditional trampolines are usually the first to show signs of rust as the metal grinds on each other and wares off any protective coatings that may have been applied. At Springfree we don’t use springs (hence the name) instead we use fibreglass rods Which not only are a safer option, but they last longer and have protective rod sleeves which can be replaced if they start to wear and tear. These rods cannot rust and will stay weatherproof even through the harshest of climates. 

Sun Damage

The other relentless factor that will affect the life of your trampoline is UV damage. This is potentially very dangerous as a weakened surface mat or safety net could result in significant injury to a jumper. Failing that, at very least, you will be up for the cost of repairing or replacing the damaged part.

At Springfree, safety is our number one priority. That is why we only use UV protected mat rods and net rods. We also ensure we only use UV-resistant polypropylene mats and safety enclosures (FlexiNet) which have a UV coating tested to 5000 hours .

Storm damage

The nature of owning a trampoline means you have a responsibility to ensure it is safely secured or stored during inclement weather. Most trampolines will have some method available for anchoring them to the ground in high-wind conditions. As these anchors vary depending on the brand, you need to ensure each one is sufficient and secure. At Springfree we offer a Ground Anchor system that is simple to install and you can add as many anchors as you need to ensure it is safe for your conditions. 

While not always necessary, sometimes you may need to collapse your trampoline in order to ensure safety for your family and neighbours. In this case, you want a trampoline that you can disassemble quickly and efficiently. Once again most trampolines are different and you want to make sure you are aware of the process before it’s too late. At Springfree we have designed the FlexiNet to be easily collapsible and if need be the frame can be dismantled and stored away securely.

Storing Away

Depending on where you live, you may find your trampoline goes into hibernation over the colder months. The Springfree™ Trampoline design was specifically built for all climates and after 10 years in the market in the colder climates such as Canada and parts of the USA. People have found that the trampoline withstands heavy layers of snow and cold weather. If you live in areas that experience snow and excessively cold temperatures and would like to cover the trampoline a simple layer of Tarp  over the trampoline once you take the mat down ads a protective layer from the elements.

If you would like more tips on caring for your trampoline, visit the Springfree website today! 

 

Top 5 Valentine's Day DIY Craft Ideas

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With Valentine's Day around the corner, try these five DIY craft ideas with your family! They'll keep little ones busy and are lots of fun for the entire family. 

1. Candy Heart Box | Difficulty: Beginner

Recycle a large heart box (that was previously filled with chocolates) and fill a bunch of paper cupcake liners with an assortment of candy and choclates. It's an easy DIY that lets you control the kind of candy/chocolate that's going in and looks amazing as a Valentine's Day gift. 

 

2. Hand Print Valentines | Difficulty: Easy

Grab some red finger paint and use two handprints to create a heart on card stock - Make sure there's an adult present! You can cut this card out or just fold it, but it makes a great Valentine's Day keepsake for parents or grandparents. 

 

3. Button Heart | Difficulty: Easy

Adults or older children can help cut out a heart from construction paper, while younger ones glue an assortment of buttons to decorate the heart. This button heart looks great as a Valentine or hung up in a frame. (Source)

 

4. Sprinkle Dipped Waffle Cookies | Difficulty: Easy

Who doesn't love sweets on Valentine's Day? These waffle cookies are lots of fun to make and look great. All you need are waffle cookies, melting chocolate, sprinkles, and parchment paper. Dip one end of each waffle cookie in the melted chocolate then decorate with sprinkles. Let cool on parchment paper. (Source)

 

5. Heart Garland | Difficulty: Easy

Using construction paper or felt, cut out hearts and glue in pairs with twine or string in between. Hang the garland over the mantle or even decorate a child's room with it! (Source)

Amanda Parker: Fun Activities for Kids, Part 3

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It is important that children lead healthier lifestyles and incorporate physical activity into their daily schedules. Recent research has shown that there has been an increase in childhood obesity amongst children. It is therefore paramount, that with the right help, children are encouraged to take part in physical activity through fun games that stimulate both body and mind. Fun games can be accessed easily and can help keep children healthy and active now, in addition to contributing to a more positive attitude towards being physically active later in life. Children also have the opportunity to develop social and motor skills through sport and physical education. This can help to increase levels of self-confidence and self-esteem, which are associated with improving in sport. Below are a range of games that children can take part in with minimal equipment that are easy to set up. 

Cat and Mouse Relay

A fun and energetic, quick-paced relay race game using teamwork and coordination. Don’t get caught out!

  • Time: 15 min
  • Recommended age: all ages
  • Size of group: minimum of 4 players
  • Equipment: x2 relay batons or an object similar to a stick

 

How to Play Cat and Mouse Relay

  • Set up a square (roughly 5x5m up to 10x10m)
  • Place the players in lines in opposite corners of the square.
  • The players at the front should be holding the baton
  • Each player with the baton runs in a clockwise direction around the square trying to catch the other player before they return to their original team and pass the baton onto the next player in their team.
  • The circuit is continuous and each of the team’s players keep running until they catch the other team out.

 

Meet Amanda Parker

Amanda Parker started competing in trampoline at the age of 6 and was representing Great Britain by the time she was 16. By 17 she had competed in her first major international event and finished 2nd in the World Age Group Games in 2003. From there, Amanda made vast improvements and became a member of the senior British team representing Great Britain in numerous World Cups and World Championships in individual and synchronized trampoline. Her biggest achievements to date are being the 2013 World Games Champion and World Champion in synchronised Trampoline with her partner Kat Driscoll. She was the reserve for the London 2012 Games and holds the record for the highest scoring British female internationally. Amanda was ranked 4th individually in Europe in 2012. Amanda is thankful for all the support she has received to help her to become a World Class trampolinist. Her parents help and support of her dreams continues as they follow her around the world to see her compete. She has a fantastic coaching team at Edgbarrow Trampoline Club and within the Great Britain National Programme to help her reach her full potential. Additionally Amanda is grateful to her sponsor Springfree Trampoline and the funding received through UK Sport that supports her journey on reaching her dream to be an Olympic athlete.

Recipes with Rosie: Healthy Smoothies

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Our new video series, Recipes with Rosie, helps teach you how to cook Kid friendly meals developed by Springfree Ambassador, World Champion and Olympic Gold Medalist in Trampoline, Rosie MacLennan. In episode two, Rosie and her kid helpers are making delicious and nutritious smoothies. 

Rosie's To-Go Smoothie

  • 1 banana
  • Frozen blueberries
  • Handful of spinach
  • 1 spoonful almond butter
  • 1 scoop protein (optional)
  • Flax Seeds
  • Hemp Seeds
  • Almond Milk
  • Sprinkle of cinnamon

Secretly Super Healthy!

  • ½ up cooked beets (peel, seal in tinfoil and bake at 400 for 45 minutes or until fork tender)
  • ½ cup mixed frozen berries
  • ¼ cup of carrot
  • ½ cup spinach
  • ½ cup kale
  • ¼ cup frozen banana
  • ¼ cup almond milk
  • 1 tbsp flax seed
  • 1 scoop protein
  • 2 small packs stevia or 1 tbsp honey
  • Optional: Add Ice

Pear

  • 2 pears (stems and pitted)
  • 1 apple (stemmed and pitted)
  • ¼ avocado
  • ½ cup spinach
  • ¼ cup natural coconut water
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 tbs[ chia or salba seeds
  • 1 scoop protein( if you want)
  • Dash of cinnamon and vanilla extract
  • Spoon full of honey or two small packets of stevia
  • Optional: Add Ice

 

Directions for all Smoothies

  • ​Blend!
Categories: 

Back to school – a balancing act

Keeping up the bounce when you’re back to school

Nothing is quite as thrilling — or challenging — as the beginning of a new school year. While your kids might be worried or excited about new friends and new teachers, they soon settle in.  As the months progress, learning  can become an effort or the words ‘I’m bored’ sneak into afternoon homework time.

5 tips on how to balance play and learning during the after school period, for happy and healthy kids.

  1. Homework, housework, playtime

School work and homework are key to a great learning experience, as well as a great discipline to have.  Most kids favour playtime over study so balancing their afternoon with a healthy dose of both is ideal for their mental and physical development. Taking a break from homework to play outdoors burns off extra energy and gives them a chance to be creative while having fun. A trampoline is a great outdoor energy burner for the backyard. The more time spent bouncing, the more children develop their motor skills and coordination.  A study done by Science Direct on the effects of trampoline exercise intervention on motor performance and balance found significant performance improvement in all post-tests that took place over a 12 week training program that included a variety of trampoline exercises. The results of the study reported improved balance and coordination ability of all participants. (Research in Development Disabilities 34 (2013) Science Direct)

Mix up the afternoons with a healthy balance of homework, playtime and household chores to keep the kids stimulated and energised and their  little bodies and minds active.  

2. Keep the imagination alive

It can be a challenge for a parent when the school lets you know that your child is not engaged at school or struggling with their work.  Research shows that a good balance of left and right brain extracurricular activities after school stimulates the endorphins kids need to concentrate and have energy in the classroom.

This means less time using the tablet on the couch and more time using their imagination. Keep it simple - something as common as a large cardboard box can be a vehicle for some very creative play – a fort, a cubby house, a make-shift store, an animal cave. The options are endless. 

  3. Playdates with mates

Learn with your mates. Humans were designed for social interaction and peer to peer learning. Playdates encourage the growth of confidence as well as imagination. Afternoon playdates give kids something to look forward to as part of their back to school routine, especially as they are making new friends in a new class.  

Kids in playpool

4.  Learn outdoors

Some of life’s most important lessons are learnt playing in the backyard. Whether it be exploring nature and the circle of life or learning about their own physical capabilities. Dedicate a couple of hours after school each day to being outdoors, and if you don’t have a backyard your local park is great option!  

  5. Bounce then breakfast 

The start of the day is often when kids have the most energy.  Most parents will identify with mornings filled with lots of chatter and energy after the kids have had a good night’s sleep.

A bounce on the trampoline in the morning just before breakfast is a great way to get the blood flowing, burn off some energy and get them smiling and happy ready for the day ahead. 

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5 Jumps to Get Your Heart Racing

Exercise is important no matter what age you are, but as we get older, we tend to associate exercise with going to the gym.  Gyms can be expensive and crowded, which for some people can be a deterrent to exercise.  For those that hate the gym, there’s still hope! All you need is a set of workout clothes, a Springfree Trampoline, and yourself – You don’t even need to go any further than your own backyard. Here are 5 easy jumps that will get your heart racing!

1. Straight Jump

The Straight Jump is one of the easiest jumps to tackle and is a great place to start if you’re new to trampolines. Start in the middle of the mat and jump vertically with the body held straight and arms in a straight line above the body for takeoff. Tip: Use your arms to help propel your body higher.

 

2. Jumping Jack

Most people are familiar with jumping jacks, but few think to try them on a trampoline. It gives the jump height and really works your full body. Start in the middle of the mat and jump vertically. While jumping, extend arms and legs out from your body. Retract arms and legs back to the sides of your body on your way back to the middle of the mat.

 

3. Seat Drop

This move looks difficult, but is easy and a lot of fun! Jump vertically in the center of the mat, but land in a seated position with legs straight and hands at your side. Use the motion of the jump to propel yourself back up into a vertical position. See how many seat drops you can do in a row!

4. Tuck Jump

Stand in the middle of the mat and jump vertically. Tuck your knees into your chest and let your hands grasp your legs. Straighten out on your way down.

 

5. Half Twist

Starting in the middle of the mat, jump vertically and rotate body around in a half circle. Control your rotation and try to make as many rotations as you can in a row.

 

Jumping can be a lot of fun, but it’s also a great working. Did you know that 10 minutes of jumping generates the same heart rate as 30 minutes of running? Don’t let the gym keep you from working out, try one of our jump routines in your backyard today! 

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Amanda Parker: Fun Activities for Kids, Part 2

It is important that children lead healthier lifestyles and incorporate physical activity into their daily schedules. Recent research has shown that there has been an increase in childhood obesity amongst children. It is therefore paramount, that with the right help, children are encouraged to take part in physical activity through fun games that stimulate both body and mind. Fun games can be accessed easily and can help keep children healthy and active now, in addition to contributing to a more positive attitude towards being physically active later in life. Children also have the opportunity to develop social and motor skills through sport and physical education. This can help to increase levels of self-confidence and self-esteem, which are associated with improving in sport. Below are a range of games that children can take part in with minimal equipment that are easy to set up.

Human Knot

Time: 15 min

Recommended age: all ages

Size of group: it doesn’t matter

Equipment: none

A problem-solving game and fun activity at a camp or at a party. Players have to utilize communication and teamwork skills, devising strategies to solve the puzzle and untangle the knot they have created.

 

Make the Human Knot

  • Players to put their right arm into the air and to reach over and take the right hand of another player.
  • They shouldn't hold the hands of players standing next to them.
  • When everyone has a hand, tell players to hold their left hands in the air and to take the left hand of another player. This should be a different person to the one whose right hand they are holding.
  • Again, they shouldn't take the hand of their neighbors.

 

Untangle the Human Knot

  • This is the hard part for the players. Tell them that they must now untangle themselves from the knot - without letting go of any hands at any time -- to make a circle.
  • You can set a time limit, if you wish. Keep in mind, it can take a while for the group to work out moves and, unless players get frustrated, they learn a lot about each other if they have time to work things through.
  • If a player breaks the chain by letting go of a hand, the game is void and the group must start over.

 

Rule Variations

  • Sometimes, a group gets lucky and untangles itself very quickly. If this happens, start over. Ideally, you want all players to work through a tricky untangling.
  • If a group just can't untangle itself, give players the chance to change hands once - encourage them to discuss the best moves before they do this.
  • If you're working with multiple groups, make the game competitive and tell players that the first group to make a circle will win.
  • Typically, players talk through their options as they work together. If you have the time, play a second game where they cannot speak and a third where you blindfold them - this gives their communication and teamwork skills a real workout.

 

Meet Amanda Parker

Amanda Parker started competing in trampoline at the age of 6 and was representing Great Britain by the time she was 16. By 17 she had competed in her first major international event and finished 2nd in the World Age Group Games in 2003. From there, Amanda made vast improvements and became a member of the senior British team representing Great Britain in numerous World Cups and World Championships in individual and synchronized trampoline.

Her biggest achievements to date are being the 2013 World Games Champion and World Champion in synchronised Trampoline with her partner Kat Driscoll. She was the reserve for the London 2012 Games and holds the record for the highest scoring British female internationally. Amanda was ranked 4th individually in Europe in 2012.

Amanda is thankful for all the support she has received to help her to become a World Class trampolinist. Her parents help and support of her dreams continues as they follow her around the world to see her compete. She has a fantastic coaching team at Edgbarrow Trampoline Club and within the Great Britain National Programme to help her reach her full potential. Additionally Amanda is grateful to her sponsor Springfree Trampoline and the funding received through UK Sport that supports her journey on reaching her dream to be an Olympic athlete.

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    2014 Reddot
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